Category Archives: Traffic

SPEED LIMITS LOWERED IN 77 NEIGHBOURHOODS WITH MORE TO COME

The City has been lowering speed limits in Mississauga neighbourhoods to make residential streets safer for everyone using them. Speed is a contributing factor in approximately one-third of fatal collisions according to the Ontario Traffic Council. Lower speeds are a proven way to reduce the severity of injuries in the event of a collision.

To date, speed limits have been lowered from 50 km/h to 40 km/h in 77 neighbourhoods. More than 130 School Zones have also been lowered from 40 km/h to 30 km/h. Work will continue in 2022 to lower speed limits in even more neighbourhoods across the city. 

These changes, which are part of the City’s Neighbourhood Area Speed Limit Project, help to advance the City’s commitment to Vision Zero. Mississauga is working to prevent fatalities and serious injuries due to collisions on our roadways.

Lower speed limits in neighbourhoods 

When a speed limit is lowered to 40 km/h, new speed limit signs are installed on streets at the entrances and exits to all neighbourhoods. The new speed limits take effect when the new speed limit signs are installed. The 40 km/h speed limit applies for the entire neighbourhood unless otherwise indicated by signage (for example, when it becomes 30 km/h in a School Zone.)

Lower speed limits in School Zones 

School Zone speed limits in residential neighbourhoods are being lowered from 40 km/h to 30 km/h. In addition, Community Safety Zones are designated in all School Zones. In 2021, more than 110 new Community Safety Zones were created. Within a Community Safety Zone, fines increase.

Find out what neighbourhoods have been completed 

Watch for new speed limit signs in your neighbourhood. To check what neighbourhoods have been completed, check the mapon mississauga.ca/roadsafety.

You can search by address or focus on an area of the city. Green shading shows neighbourhoods which have been completed. The orange areas show those where the speed limit changes will be coming soon.

Additional speed reduction measures 

Other speed reduction measures completed by the City in 2021 include:

·        13 approved traffic calming projects

·        200 passive traffic calming measures

·        600+ speed studies conducted

·        22 Automated Speed Enforcement Cameras

·        50 Slow Streets implemented

·        3,000 Slow Down lawn signs delivered to residents

To learn more about road safety in Mississauga, visit mississauga.ca/roadsafety.

Slow Streets have Rolled Out in Mississauga Neighbourhoods

With COVID-19 public health protocols still in place this summer, the City has decided to move forward with expanding its Slow Streets initiative, piloted as Quiet Streets in 2020, in all City wards. Slow Streets have rolled out in neighbourhoods throughout Mississauga to give residents ample space to safely move around their neighbourhood. They will be in place until the end of October 2021, to allow time to prepare for the winter season. 

Slow Streets are a temporary traffic calming measure that involve installing road barricades and signage on neighbourhood streets. Slow Streets are intended to provide additional space for pedestrians and cyclists to move around their neighbourhood while safely maintaining physical distancing, following COVID-19 public health recommendations. Slow Streets also reduce speeding and limit traffic to local vehicles. Slow Streets will remain accessible to car traffic and two-way travel. Posted speed limits will remain the same.

Slow Streets direct drivers to slow down and share the road with other road users. By implementing Slow Streets, those walking, running, biking and using mobility devices can comfortably use the road while being able to physical distance.

Temporary barricades and signs will be installed at main vehicle entry points. This installation signals to drivers to slow down, avoid passing and take extra care if they live in the area and are navigating the road. The barricades will also allow for easy movement of essential emergency service vehicles as well as waste and road maintenance vehicles. Specific layouts will vary somewhat depending on characteristics such as road width and parking usage on each roadway.

Slow Streets are not intended for multi-lane major collector or arterial roadways or with roads that have MiWay routes. 

There are no changes to services such as waste collection. Please put your green, blue and grey carts at the curb following your regular schedule.

Learn more about the City’s road safety initiatives, visit mississauga.ca/services-and-programs/transportation-and-streets/road-safety/slow-streets/

Mississauga’s Proposed Parking Master Plan Now Available for Public Comment

The City of Mississauga’s proposed Parking Master Plan, “Parking Matters” is now available for public comment. 

The master plan details how community parking will evolve as the City continues to grow and transform. The plan’s content reflects the input received during extensive public and stakeholder consultation staff conducted over the past two years.

“The Parking Master Plan and Implementation Strategy looks at all aspects of parking in Mississauga,” said Andy Harvey, Director, Traffic Management and Municipal Parking. “Parkingpolicy, planning, funding and emerging technologies were studied to develop an approach to parking that is made for Mississauga.The Parking Master Plan will help improve efficiency, manage parking in the future and better align public and private parking with transportation and economic development goals across the City.” 

The master plan provides short and long-term recommendations focused on 10 themes. These include Municipal Parking Provisions and Management, Funding and Finance, Safety and Accessibility and Technology and Innovation.

Visit the Parking Matters website to provide comments. All input received by May 31 will be considered. 

The master plan will go to General Committee for approval on June 12.

Learn more about Parking Matters in Mississauga.

MISSISSAUGA’S FIRST TRANSPORTATION MASTER PLAN SETS VISION FOR FREEDOM TO MOVE

The City’s first Transportation Master Plan (TMP) was presented at General Committee on Wednesday. The plan outlines a vision, six goals and over 90 action items to guide the future of the City’s transportation system from today to 2041. Inherent in the plan is a commitment to advancing Vision Zero, a strategy to eliminate all traffic fatalities and injuries. 

“This new plan is an important part of our efforts to keep Mississauga moving, regardless of where, when or how you choose to travel. We are working to build a world-class, transit-oriented city where people can easily move across our city and beyond, whether that’s to get to school, work, shopping or activities while helping businesses boost their productivity through the efficient movement of goods and services.

As the business capital of Canada and home to Pearson International Airport, five 400-series highways and several major distribution centres, this plan will help ensure Mississauga remains open for business as a vital economic hub for the movement of goods at the national scale,” said Mayor Bonnie Crombie. “Above all, it recognizes the important role that livable, walkable, healthy communities play in encouraging active transportation.  It also provides us with a road map to help us realize our goal of becoming a Vision Zero city, where it is safe for all types of travellers to share the road.”

The TMP is future-focused and comes at an important time in the City’s development.

“We have reached a new phase of higher-density urban growth,” said Janice Baker, City Manager and Chief Administrative Officer (CAO). “There is a growing demand from our residents for multi-modal travel options – walking, cycling, transit, ridehailing and other alternatives to driving. In looking ahead to 2041, we know our demographics will shift, with new young families and our aging population. In addition, we aim to keep up with rapid change and innovation in the transportation sector, such as integration with smartphones and other smart devices, especially automated, connected, electric and shared vehicles (ACES).”

Highlights of the Plan

Vision 

The freedom to move is vital to support the quality of life in Mississauga.  The TMP lays out a vision for providing mobility in our city from today to 2041:  In Mississauga, everyone and everything will have the freedom to move safely, easily and efficiently to anywhere at any time.

Goals

The vision will be realized through six goals to ensure the transportation system fulfills its essential role in city building.

·        Safety: Freedom from Harm

Safe conditions for all travellers, advancing Vision Zero by supporting hazard-free travel and striving for zero fatalities.

·        Inclusion: Freedom from Barriers

An accessible network, where moving is easy regardless of a person’s age, ability, income or familiarity with the city.

·        Integration: Freedom of Choice

An integrated network, where people and goods have viable options for moving within and beyond the city.

·        Connectivity: Freedom of Access

Simple and pleasant connections between people and the places and things they need to prosper.

·        Health: Freedom to Flourish

Support for the health of people and the planet, with more people-powered trips, lower vehicle emissions and better stewardship of the natural environment.

·        Resilience: Freedom to Evolve

Leadership in adapting to changes that reshape the transportation system and how it is used.

Action Plan

The TMP is future-focused and includes over 90 proposed actions to implement the plan over the short term (1-5 years), medium (6 – 15 years) and long term (16+years). Actions in the TMP will be built into staff work plans over the coming years. Those with financial implications will be presented to Council for consideration through the City’s annual budget process.

“Our transportation system is more than a network of roads and traffic lanes,” said Geoff Wright, Commissioner of Transportation and Works. “It is an interconnected system of sidewalks, trails, crosswalks, cycling facilities and roads as well as public services like transit, parking and traffic management and regulation of private service providers like taxis, Transportation Network Companies (TNCs – such as Uber and Lyft), towing and delivery vehicles. To continue to build a great city with a resilient transportation system, we have joined together with leaders from across the organization – from Planning & Building to Parks, Forestry & Environment — to consider all the long-term planning aspects of this complex city-wide system.” 

Progress on the actions of the TMP will be tracked and reported annually. Routine updates to the TMP will take place in coordination with updates to the Mississauga Official Plan.

The TMP is the result of Mississauga Moves, a two-year study that combined research and analysis with a public conversation about the future of mobility. The City analysed transportation and transit data, policies, future trends and international best practices. Public engagement took place in-person and online with a dedicated project website. Key community and industry stakeholders as well as other levels of government were also consulted in the process. Over the course of two years, the project team had more than 2,000 face-to-face conversations with community members and made more than 10,000 online connections through the website and social media. 

The full plan is available online. Council is expected to approve the plan next week.