Category Archives: Clarkson

DISRUPTION TO WASTE COLLECTION SERVICES IN SOME AREAS OF PEEL REGION

Clarkson Collection Impacted

As a result of a labour dispute involving one of Peel’s waste collection contractors, Emterra Environmental and its employees, some residents in Brampton, Caledon and Mississauga will experience temporary changes to their curbside waste pickup beginning today, Monday, December 6. Please refer to this map for information about impacted areas. 

For strike-affected residents during their garbage week

  • Continue to put garbage and organics at the curb on your scheduled garbage collection day. 
  • You may experience collection delays. Please leave garbage and organics at the curb until further notice (even on the weekend). 
  • No bulky items will be picked up during the labour disruption.

For strike-affected residents during their recycling week:

  • Recycling will not be picked up during the labour disruption.
  • Please hold onto your recycling until further notice. 
  • Your organics will not be collected on your recycling week. It will only be collected on your garbage week.

Yard Waste Collection for strike-affected residents:

  • Yard waste will not be picked up during the labour disruption.
  • Please hold onto your yard waste until further notice. 

Check peelregion.ca/waste for further updates or follow Public Works on Twitter at twitter.com/peelpublicworks for updated service information.

SPEED LIMITS LOWERED IN 77 NEIGHBOURHOODS WITH MORE TO COME

The City has been lowering speed limits in Mississauga neighbourhoods to make residential streets safer for everyone using them. Speed is a contributing factor in approximately one-third of fatal collisions according to the Ontario Traffic Council. Lower speeds are a proven way to reduce the severity of injuries in the event of a collision.

To date, speed limits have been lowered from 50 km/h to 40 km/h in 77 neighbourhoods. More than 130 School Zones have also been lowered from 40 km/h to 30 km/h. Work will continue in 2022 to lower speed limits in even more neighbourhoods across the city. 

These changes, which are part of the City’s Neighbourhood Area Speed Limit Project, help to advance the City’s commitment to Vision Zero. Mississauga is working to prevent fatalities and serious injuries due to collisions on our roadways.

Lower speed limits in neighbourhoods 

When a speed limit is lowered to 40 km/h, new speed limit signs are installed on streets at the entrances and exits to all neighbourhoods. The new speed limits take effect when the new speed limit signs are installed. The 40 km/h speed limit applies for the entire neighbourhood unless otherwise indicated by signage (for example, when it becomes 30 km/h in a School Zone.)

Lower speed limits in School Zones 

School Zone speed limits in residential neighbourhoods are being lowered from 40 km/h to 30 km/h. In addition, Community Safety Zones are designated in all School Zones. In 2021, more than 110 new Community Safety Zones were created. Within a Community Safety Zone, fines increase.

Find out what neighbourhoods have been completed 

Watch for new speed limit signs in your neighbourhood. To check what neighbourhoods have been completed, check the mapon mississauga.ca/roadsafety.

You can search by address or focus on an area of the city. Green shading shows neighbourhoods which have been completed. The orange areas show those where the speed limit changes will be coming soon.

Additional speed reduction measures 

Other speed reduction measures completed by the City in 2021 include:

·        13 approved traffic calming projects

·        200 passive traffic calming measures

·        600+ speed studies conducted

·        22 Automated Speed Enforcement Cameras

·        50 Slow Streets implemented

·        3,000 Slow Down lawn signs delivered to residents

To learn more about road safety in Mississauga, visit mississauga.ca/roadsafety.

Slow Streets have Rolled Out in Mississauga Neighbourhoods

With COVID-19 public health protocols still in place this summer, the City has decided to move forward with expanding its Slow Streets initiative, piloted as Quiet Streets in 2020, in all City wards. Slow Streets have rolled out in neighbourhoods throughout Mississauga to give residents ample space to safely move around their neighbourhood. They will be in place until the end of October 2021, to allow time to prepare for the winter season. 

Slow Streets are a temporary traffic calming measure that involve installing road barricades and signage on neighbourhood streets. Slow Streets are intended to provide additional space for pedestrians and cyclists to move around their neighbourhood while safely maintaining physical distancing, following COVID-19 public health recommendations. Slow Streets also reduce speeding and limit traffic to local vehicles. Slow Streets will remain accessible to car traffic and two-way travel. Posted speed limits will remain the same.

Slow Streets direct drivers to slow down and share the road with other road users. By implementing Slow Streets, those walking, running, biking and using mobility devices can comfortably use the road while being able to physical distance.

Temporary barricades and signs will be installed at main vehicle entry points. This installation signals to drivers to slow down, avoid passing and take extra care if they live in the area and are navigating the road. The barricades will also allow for easy movement of essential emergency service vehicles as well as waste and road maintenance vehicles. Specific layouts will vary somewhat depending on characteristics such as road width and parking usage on each roadway.

Slow Streets are not intended for multi-lane major collector or arterial roadways or with roads that have MiWay routes. 

There are no changes to services such as waste collection. Please put your green, blue and grey carts at the curb following your regular schedule.

Learn more about the City’s road safety initiatives, visit mississauga.ca/services-and-programs/transportation-and-streets/road-safety/slow-streets/

CVC Foundation partners with Timber Specialties Limited on accessible boardwalk

Supported by a generous donation of lumber from Timber Specialties Limited, Credit Valley Conservation (CVC) plans a series of boardwalk renovations at Rattray Marsh Conservation Area throughout 2021. This includes reconstructing the conservation area’s Knoll Trail boardwalk and removing over 100 steps, making the Knoll Trail fully accessible.

“We’re beyond grateful to Timber Specialties Limited for their generous donation. We’re committed to removing barriers for people with disabilities, wherever possible, and we’re so glad that Timber Specialties Limited shares our commitment to accessibility, the environment and our local communities.”

Jon MacMull, Acting Executive Director for CVC Foundation

With limited recreation opportunities available due to the pandemic, people have rediscovered nearby conservation areas for outdoor recreation. Rattray Marsh is CVC’s most visited conservation area. 2020 saw record visitation, with over 334,000 people enjoying the boardwalks, bridges, beach and scenic vistas – a 67 per cent increase over 2019.

“We are pleased to donate Canada’s most popular, environmentally-certified MicroPro Sienna treated wood to the Knoll Trail boardwalk project,” said Brad Burmeister, Vice President, Timber Specialties Limited. ”As a company that understands and appreciates the value of quality, outdoor spaces, it’s an honour to contribute to an accessible boardwalk that will allow everyone to experience the beauty and wellness that can be found at Rattray Marsh Conservation Area.” 

Rattray Marsh is an environmental gem located in a unique natural setting within the City of Mississauga. As the last remaining lakefront marsh between Toronto and Burlington, this environmentally sensitive wetland offers a different experience for nature lovers. Not only is it a refuge for wildlife, it’s also a refuge for local residents, who are able to find comfort and solace throughout the pandemic in this unique natural setting so close to home.

CVC’s conservation areas have long relied on a healthy mix of local government support and community donations to keep them beautiful, thriving and accessible.

About Credit Valley Conservation (CVC) 
Credit Valley Conservation (CVC) is a local conservation authority established by the Ontario government in 1954 to protect, restore and enhance the natural environment of the Credit River watershed. That watershed is the area of land where all rainfall, snowmelt and runoff drains into lands and waters flowing into the Credit River. CVC creates connections between people and nature, knowledge and action. It inspires a deep appreciation for the role of nature in keeping people connected, healthy and happy. CVC is a member of Conservation Ontario.

Culture Lives Here – Have Your Say on Creating Vibrant Cultural Districts within Mississauga

What cultural opportunities would you like to see in Mississauga? With a growing arts, culture and creative industry scene and unique neighbourhoods that are emerging as popular hubs of creativity and innovation, Mississauga is well-positioned to be an arts-friendly city. Many neighbourhoods in Mississauga are intensifying and we are witnessing a growing cluster of arts and culture facilities, and diverse entertainment, retail and dining options. The City will build on these existing assets and support the growth of these neighbourhoods as distinct Cultural Districts through new cultural infrastructure and unique programming.

Mississauga has identified six Cultural Districts, each with its own unique identity and community priorities, under its Cultural Districts Implementation Plan:

  • Clarkson 
  • Cooksville 
  • Downtown Core 
  • Malton 
  • Port Credit 
  • Streetsville 

Starting in May, you can complete an online survey to share your feedback on the Cultural Districts Implementation Plan and ideas for future activities in the Districts. Your input will help inform the development of arts and culture spaces and opportunities and help the City map out the first phase of implementation in the Districts. Many exciting things can happen in the Districts (e.g. public art, public space improvements, street festivals, pop-ups, performances, patios) and we want to hear from the community.

Benefits of Cultural Districts

Cultural Districts play an important role for the city. They offer residents and visitors alike a diversity of experiences within a distinct, concentrated mixed-use area. Cultural Districts help strengthen the local economy, create a sense of place and support community well-being, and deepen local cultural capacity. The six cultural districts will provide opportunities for the City to attract visitors, support local businesses, increase arts and culture and create vibrant neighbourhood hubs. Major benefits of Cultural Districts include: 

·         Creating opportunities for participating in arts and culture activities

·         Enhancing and beautifying public spaces and streets

·         Celebrating the unique local character and heritage of a neighbourhood

·         Providing new avenues for social interaction and community gathering

·         Encouraging and supporting economic development and business growth

·         Supporting the growth of creative industries and cultural production

·         Addressing needs of specific neighbourhoods

·         Boosting local tourism and the evening economy

·         Preserving and reusing historic infrastructure, buildings and landmarks

·         Connecting people to outdoor spaces (e.g. parks, open spaces)

In February 2021, Council approved the Implementation of Cultural Districts, which are a key recommendation within the Culture Master Plan.

To learn more about Mississauga’s six Cultural Districts and to fill out the online survey, visit yoursay.mississauga.ca/cultural-districts.