Category Archives: Clarkson

CVC Foundation partners with Timber Specialties Limited on accessible boardwalk

Supported by a generous donation of lumber from Timber Specialties Limited, Credit Valley Conservation (CVC) plans a series of boardwalk renovations at Rattray Marsh Conservation Area throughout 2021. This includes reconstructing the conservation area’s Knoll Trail boardwalk and removing over 100 steps, making the Knoll Trail fully accessible.

“We’re beyond grateful to Timber Specialties Limited for their generous donation. We’re committed to removing barriers for people with disabilities, wherever possible, and we’re so glad that Timber Specialties Limited shares our commitment to accessibility, the environment and our local communities.”

Jon MacMull, Acting Executive Director for CVC Foundation

With limited recreation opportunities available due to the pandemic, people have rediscovered nearby conservation areas for outdoor recreation. Rattray Marsh is CVC’s most visited conservation area. 2020 saw record visitation, with over 334,000 people enjoying the boardwalks, bridges, beach and scenic vistas – a 67 per cent increase over 2019.

“We are pleased to donate Canada’s most popular, environmentally-certified MicroPro Sienna treated wood to the Knoll Trail boardwalk project,” said Brad Burmeister, Vice President, Timber Specialties Limited. ”As a company that understands and appreciates the value of quality, outdoor spaces, it’s an honour to contribute to an accessible boardwalk that will allow everyone to experience the beauty and wellness that can be found at Rattray Marsh Conservation Area.” 

Rattray Marsh is an environmental gem located in a unique natural setting within the City of Mississauga. As the last remaining lakefront marsh between Toronto and Burlington, this environmentally sensitive wetland offers a different experience for nature lovers. Not only is it a refuge for wildlife, it’s also a refuge for local residents, who are able to find comfort and solace throughout the pandemic in this unique natural setting so close to home.

CVC’s conservation areas have long relied on a healthy mix of local government support and community donations to keep them beautiful, thriving and accessible.

About Credit Valley Conservation (CVC) 
Credit Valley Conservation (CVC) is a local conservation authority established by the Ontario government in 1954 to protect, restore and enhance the natural environment of the Credit River watershed. That watershed is the area of land where all rainfall, snowmelt and runoff drains into lands and waters flowing into the Credit River. CVC creates connections between people and nature, knowledge and action. It inspires a deep appreciation for the role of nature in keeping people connected, healthy and happy. CVC is a member of Conservation Ontario.

Culture Lives Here – Have Your Say on Creating Vibrant Cultural Districts within Mississauga

What cultural opportunities would you like to see in Mississauga? With a growing arts, culture and creative industry scene and unique neighbourhoods that are emerging as popular hubs of creativity and innovation, Mississauga is well-positioned to be an arts-friendly city. Many neighbourhoods in Mississauga are intensifying and we are witnessing a growing cluster of arts and culture facilities, and diverse entertainment, retail and dining options. The City will build on these existing assets and support the growth of these neighbourhoods as distinct Cultural Districts through new cultural infrastructure and unique programming.

Mississauga has identified six Cultural Districts, each with its own unique identity and community priorities, under its Cultural Districts Implementation Plan:

  • Clarkson 
  • Cooksville 
  • Downtown Core 
  • Malton 
  • Port Credit 
  • Streetsville 

Starting in May, you can complete an online survey to share your feedback on the Cultural Districts Implementation Plan and ideas for future activities in the Districts. Your input will help inform the development of arts and culture spaces and opportunities and help the City map out the first phase of implementation in the Districts. Many exciting things can happen in the Districts (e.g. public art, public space improvements, street festivals, pop-ups, performances, patios) and we want to hear from the community.

Benefits of Cultural Districts

Cultural Districts play an important role for the city. They offer residents and visitors alike a diversity of experiences within a distinct, concentrated mixed-use area. Cultural Districts help strengthen the local economy, create a sense of place and support community well-being, and deepen local cultural capacity. The six cultural districts will provide opportunities for the City to attract visitors, support local businesses, increase arts and culture and create vibrant neighbourhood hubs. Major benefits of Cultural Districts include: 

·         Creating opportunities for participating in arts and culture activities

·         Enhancing and beautifying public spaces and streets

·         Celebrating the unique local character and heritage of a neighbourhood

·         Providing new avenues for social interaction and community gathering

·         Encouraging and supporting economic development and business growth

·         Supporting the growth of creative industries and cultural production

·         Addressing needs of specific neighbourhoods

·         Boosting local tourism and the evening economy

·         Preserving and reusing historic infrastructure, buildings and landmarks

·         Connecting people to outdoor spaces (e.g. parks, open spaces)

In February 2021, Council approved the Implementation of Cultural Districts, which are a key recommendation within the Culture Master Plan.

To learn more about Mississauga’s six Cultural Districts and to fill out the online survey, visit yoursay.mississauga.ca/cultural-districts.

Have Your Say – Does Mississauga Need an Apartment Building Standards and Maintenance Program?

Mississauga has a number of property-related by-laws that detail the requirements for maintaining rental apartment buildings and other properties across the city. Staff are currently assessing the need for an Apartment Building Standards and Maintenance Program similar to the City of Toronto’s RentSafeTO program. 

The proposed program could include a proactive rental building inspection plan.

Anyone with an interest in rental apartment building standards and maintenance can share their experiences, thoughts and ideas by visiting the public engagement website atmississauga.ca/apartment-standards-and-maintenance to ask a question and take the online survey.

The input received will help determine the need for a standards and maintenance program for rental apartment buildings in Mississauga.

The online survey is available until July 31, 2021.

Protecting our Trees: City Launches 2021 Gypsy Moth Management Program

The City of Mississauga is launching its annual Integrated Pest Management program to help reduce the number of gypsy moth caterpillars in Mississauga. This invasive insect causes tree destruction by feeding on the leaves of oak and other deciduous trees. After repeated defoliation, trees may die or become so weakened that they are vulnerable to secondary infestations.

The City will focus its efforts on areas in Mississauga that have higher populations of gypsy moth egg masses. Three strategies will be implemented:

1.  Egg Mass Scrapings: scraping gypsy moth eggs off infested trees and soak egg masses in soapy water for at least 48 hours to kill eggs.

2.  Tree Injections: injecting trees with TreeAzin® a botanical insecticide. Tree injections are anticipated to be conducted in four City parks: Applewood Hills Park, Paul Coffey Park, Huron Park and Sugar Maple Woods.

3.  Ground Sprays: licensed operators will use a product containing Bacillus thuringiensis subspecies kurstaki (Btk). Heavily infected trees will be sprayed from the ground using a controlled mechanism such as a pressurized hand-held hydraulic sprayer. Ground spraying is anticipated to be conducted in two city parks: Cedarbrook Park and Jaycee Park.

“Gypsy moth caterpillars aren’t new to Mississauga. They have been around for more than a decade. They have caused a lot of damage to the City’s already vulnerable hardwood trees. Through our comprehensive Integrated Pest Management program, we have learned how to control their populations by using different pest management strategies,” said Jodi Robillos, Director, Parks, Forestry and Environment. “We have seen the destruction gypsy moths can cause to our urban forest and many of our diverse tree species. The preservation of our urban forest canopy is criticalbecause trees are an important component of a healthy ecosystem. The goal of the gypsy moth program is to control the population and preserve the health of Mississauga’s urban forest canopy. This is why our Integrated Pest Management program is important and why our continued efforts matter.”

New this year, the City is launching an Interactive Treatment Map and a Reporting Form. The Interactive Treatment Map will display the publicly-owned trees along specific streets and in certain parks proposed for treatment. The Reporting Form will allow residents to report gypsy moth observations by inputting details including quantities and life stage observed and sharing photos.

Over the next few weeks, City staff and contractors will be applying pest management strategies in certain areas around the city. Residents are reminded to maintain a physical distance of at least 2 metres (or 6 feet) from staff.

For more information about gypsy moths in Mississauga, visit missisauga.ca/gypsymoth.

Controlled Burn Planned at Jack Darling Memorial Park to Preserve Ecosystem

The City of Mississauga is planning a controlled burn at Jack Darling Memorial Park sometime this weekend (April 17 or 18, depending on weather conditions). The controlled burn will help maintain the park’s tallgrass prairies – an ecosystem that is home to rare grasses and wildflowers, and also attracts many rare species of birds and insects. Periodic burns are needed every three to four years to help regenerate tallgrass prairies and remove invasive woody plants. Prairie grasses are dormant at this time of the year, so there is no threat to prairie plants and wildlife.

For safety reasons, the park (including the leash-free area) will be closed to the public before and during the scheduled burn, and will reopen following the burn clean-up. Closure signage will be posted 24 hours in advance and neighbourhood residents have been notified by mail. Residents living in the area may also see drifting smoke from the site for 30 to 60 minutes between 11 a.m. and 2:30 p.m. on the day of the burn, and are recommended to keep their windows closed.