Category Archives: Credit Valley Conservation

CVC to Remove More Infested Ash Trees at Rattray Marsh Conservation Area

Credit Valley Conservation (CVC) will restart ash tree removals at Rattray Marsh Conservation Area due to the invasive forest pest – emerald ash borer (EAB). EAB is a shiny green beetle, not native to North America. It infests and kills 99.9 per cent of all ash trees. The trees being removed are already infested, cannot be saved and pose a hazard to people on trails and private property.

Removal of infested ash trees will begin during the week of September 17, 2015. Work will take place Monday – Friday, 8:30 a.m. to 3:30 p.m. and will continue into early 2016. Continue reading CVC to Remove More Infested Ash Trees at Rattray Marsh Conservation Area

Native Plants Bring All the Birds to the Yard

Landscaping is a source of pride for landowners. Beautiful trees, plants and flowers with bursts of vivid colour are only part of the story. The other part is the long list of welcomed visitors. Vibrant songbirds, migrating butterflies and busy bumblebees bring life and excitement to any garden. Native plants are proven to attract more welcomed wildlife, giving you a garden that’s truly buzzing.

Ontario’s local wildlife are perfectly adapted to Ontario’s native plant species. For example ruby-throated hummingbirds will eat nectar from cardinal flowers while pollinating them at the same time. When the cedar waxwing, a very beautiful bird, eats the berries from a red cedar, the germination rate is three times higher than if they didn’t pass through a bird at all. Turtlehead flower nectar contains a ‘medicine’ for bees to reduce intestinal parasites. So while bees are busy eating they are healing themselves and pollinating flowers. These examples of plant-animal symbiosis result from millennia of native plants and native wildlife evolving together in the same ecosystems. Continue reading Native Plants Bring All the Birds to the Yard