Category Archives: Credit Valley Conservation

Spring Safety Message: Exercise Caution Near Waterways

Credit valley Conservation urges residents to keep family members and pets away from the water’s edge this spring

Conservation authorities are reminding residents of dangers that exist near streams, rivers, ponds and lakes this time of year and urge people to keep family and pets away from the edge of all waterways.

Spring is quickly approaching and with warmer temperatures, people look forward to getting outdoors. Warmer temperatures also bring rain, melting snow and shifting ice, which contribute to higher, faster flowing water in watercourses. With the recent snowfall and swiftly changing temperatures, there is a possibility for localized flooding during the melting period. Slippery and unstable stream banks and extremely cold water temperatures can also lead to very hazardous conditions close to any body of water.

Please keep family members and pets safely away from all watercourses.

For more information, contact your local conservation authority:

  • Credit Valley Conservation – (905) 670-1615
  • Toronto & Region Conservation Authority – (416) 661-6514
  • Conservation Halton – (905) 336-1158
  • Lake Simcoe Region Conservation Authority – (905) 895-1281
  • Central Lake Ontario Conservation Authority – (905) 579-0411
  • Ganaraska Region Conservation Authority – (905) 885-8173
  • Nottawasaga Valley Conservation Authority – (705) 424-1479
  • Kawartha Conservation – (705) 328-2271

Conservation authorities are a provincial/municipal partnership. For 60 years, Credit Valley Conservation has worked with its partners to support a thriving environment that protects, connects and sustains us. Credit Valley Conservation gratefully acknowledges financial support from our member municipalities for facilities, programs and services: the Regions of Peel and Halton; the Cities of Mississauga and Brampton; the Towns of Caledon, Erin, Halton Hills, Mono, Oakville and Orangeville; and the Townships of Amaranth and East Garafraxa. CVC is a member of Conservation Ontario.

CVC to Remove More Infested Ash Trees at Rattray Marsh Conservation Area

Credit Valley Conservation (CVC) will restart ash tree removals at Rattray Marsh Conservation Area due to the invasive forest pest – emerald ash borer (EAB). EAB is a shiny green beetle, not native to North America. It infests and kills 99.9 per cent of all ash trees. The trees being removed are already infested, cannot be saved and pose a hazard to people on trails and private property.

Removal of infested ash trees will begin during the week of September 17, 2015. Work will take place Monday – Friday, 8:30 a.m. to 3:30 p.m. and will continue into early 2016. Continue reading CVC to Remove More Infested Ash Trees at Rattray Marsh Conservation Area

Native Plants Bring All the Birds to the Yard

Landscaping is a source of pride for landowners. Beautiful trees, plants and flowers with bursts of vivid colour are only part of the story. The other part is the long list of welcomed visitors. Vibrant songbirds, migrating butterflies and busy bumblebees bring life and excitement to any garden. Native plants are proven to attract more welcomed wildlife, giving you a garden that’s truly buzzing.

Ontario’s local wildlife are perfectly adapted to Ontario’s native plant species. For example ruby-throated hummingbirds will eat nectar from cardinal flowers while pollinating them at the same time. When the cedar waxwing, a very beautiful bird, eats the berries from a red cedar, the germination rate is three times higher than if they didn’t pass through a bird at all. Turtlehead flower nectar contains a ‘medicine’ for bees to reduce intestinal parasites. So while bees are busy eating they are healing themselves and pollinating flowers. These examples of plant-animal symbiosis result from millennia of native plants and native wildlife evolving together in the same ecosystems. Continue reading Native Plants Bring All the Birds to the Yard